Manus Inaugurated as 2011 AIA President

by WOHe








Washington, D.C. – Clark D. Manus, FAIA, CEO of Heller Manus
Architects, was inaugurated as the 87th president of the American
Institute of Architects

during ceremonies held on December 17th.  He succeeds George
H. Miller, FAIA, in representing the nearly 80,000 AIA members.

“This is our time to demonstrate the value of design in every
community in spite of challenging times for the architecture
profession,” said Manus. “I look forward to
promoting the integrative ‘power of design’ in
forging a coherent whole that balances seemingly conflicting
issues.  Stitching together communities by
design—city, country, villages—to form mutually
supportive agendas is the future of the globe. From an advocacy
standpoint, I want to champion the need to evolve from looking at
singular building designs to broader thinking about how buildings
relate more effectively to their surroundings communities and the
regional perspective.”

Manus served as AIA National Vice President; chairing the Board
Advocacy Committee and the 2010-2015 Strategic Plan following service
as a Board of Director. He chaired the AIA/USGBC Task Force to best
utilize joint resources and the AIA150 Blueprint for America Mosaic. In
his hometown and state, he was a former AIA San Francisco President and
two-time AIA California Council Board of Director. Manus has long
stressed and acted on the importance of industry alliances as well as
engaging emerging professionals in leadership.

In San Francisco, his extensive community/urban design leadership and
public contribution for two decades emerged following the 1989
earthquake. He chaired successive Mayoral Citizen Advisory Committees
facilitating the instrumental reclamation of the Central Embarcadero
and enabling the downtown Rincon Hill and Transbay Districts to be
catalysts for new residential neighborhoods.  Manus is a
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Design,
and the University at Buffalo, School of Environmental Design.

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