Knowing the economic downturn would affect business, Sun Design, Burke, Va., rebranded itself for the new economy. With the goal of increasing current job size, rebranding helped the company stay on top of its market and avoid slipping under. “We figured when things cleared up in the economy, we’d appear as more of the design/build company we are, which our basic communication wasn’t conveying,” explains Bob Gallagher, Sun Design’s president.

“We figured when things cleared up in the economy, we’d appear as more of the design/build company we are, which our basic communication wasn’t conveying.”

Bob Gallagher, president, Sun Design

Rebranding can improve a company’s bottom line by more accurately conveying the brand message. Rebranding may include changes to logos, letterhead, business cards, shirts and jobsite signs. It helps a company avoid misconceptions about what it does while attracting attention and encouraging clientele to find out what’s new.

Case for Rebranding

A company may need to rebrand if employees continually must explain what the company has to offer. If a company brand is outdated, inaccurate or misleading, the company should evaluate how much money it takes to explain and clarify the company’s message through advertising. The company also should consider how many clients are lost because of poor messaging.

In addition, rebranding can help increase job sizes or target a new market. Sun Design’s motivation to rebrand was to improve its average job sizes during down times. The company had noticed its average job size fell by $25,000. After rebranding, job sizes have grown.

For example, Sun Design previously had hired a graphic artist to tweak its logo, which improved its look and the company’s visibility. But because Sun Design’s marketing approach had changed to attract larger jobs, it needed messaging to draw those types of clients.

“We went with something more architectural and professional looking—something we believed clients would be looking for in a design/build organization,” Gallagher adds.
The company then consistently implemented the new logo on all forms of communication. According to Gallagher, consistent messaging increases awareness and the more professional logo attracted more affluent clientele.

Smart Steps

Gallagher says the following five steps helped rebrand his company:

  1. Involve the whole team: Everyone in a company is familiar with the brand. Assembling people with varying strengths and creativity will generate diverse ideas.
  2. Find a professional: Use a marketing firm to facilitate the process. Its team will have experience in helping a company move to another level.
  3. Identify the clientele: If the goal of rebranding includes reaching a new target market, it’s important to know who that target market is and how best to reach them.
  4. Consider all forms of communication: Ensure the new logo and colors translate to a uniform or jobsite sign, as well as a magazine advertisement.
  5. Ease into new branding: The transition from old to new branding should ensure clients don’t think the company is going through a complete overhaul. For example, if the company is known for uniquely shaped jobsite signs, incorporate the new logo onto the same sign shape.

Gallagher notes hiring a professional marketer is worth the investment. “I think if a remodeler gets some professional marketing help, like homeowners come to us for remodeling help, it can be beneficial in figuring out how to make the company more appealing to the people it’s trying to sell to,” he says.

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